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Public Administration Review

Public Administration Review
  1. Author: SPEA
  2. Number of episodes: 32
  3. Web site: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1540-6210/

Podcast Description:

Public Administration Review features podcast episodes that provide summaries of articles, commentaries, and Perspective pieces by the authors.

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Public Administration Review

  Name Time Artist/Performer Release Date Description Author Language  
1.PAR 76.52- Organizations, Policies, and the Roots of Public Value Failure: The Case of For-Profit Higher Education00:04:34Derrick M. Anderson8/1/2016This episode features comments by Derrick M. Anderson an assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs and the Center for Organization Research and Design at Arizona State University. Professor Anderson discusses his article titled “Organizations, Policies, and the Roots of Public Value Failure: The Case of For-Profit Higher Education” co-authored with Gabel Taggart, a doctoral candidate in public administration and policy at Arizona State University.SPEAEnglishDownload
2.PAR 76.42 - Building Global Public Administration Knowledge00:05:51James L. Perry6/3/2016The PAR editorial team is committed to facilitating development of global public administration knowledge. We look forward to working with the global public administration community in meeting this challenge of the early twenty-first century.SPEAEnglishDownload
3.PAR 76.51 - The Politics of Higher Education: University President Ideology and External Networking00:06:43Tom Rabovsky and Amanda Rutherford3/4/2016This episode features comments by Tom Rabovsky and Amanda Rutherford who are professors in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University Bloomington. Professors Rabovsky and Rutherford discuss their article titled “The Politics of Higher Education: University President Ideology and External Networking.” This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 5.SPEAEnglishDownload
4.PAR 76.34- Regulatory Transformation: Lessons from Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection00:12:22Daniel Esty2/12/2016This episode features comments by Daniel Esty who is the Hillhouse Professor at Yale University with primary appointments in Yale’s Law and Environment Schools and a secondary appointment at the Yale School of Management. Professor Esty discusses his article titled “Regulatory Transformation: Lessons from Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.” This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 3.SPEAEnglishDownload
5.PAR 74.62 (Full Version)- The Legitimacy of U.S. Government Agency Power00:20:08Daniel Feldman2/10/2016This episode features comments by Daniel Feldman, Professor of public management at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Professor Feldman discusses his article titled, “The Legitimacy of U.S. Government Agency Power.”SPEAEnglishDownload
6.PAR 74.62 (Abridged Version)- The Legitimacy of U.S. Government Agency Power00:11:46Daniel Feldman2/10/2016This episode features comments by Daniel Feldman, Professor of public management at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Professor Feldman discusses his article titled, “The Legitimacy of U.S. Government Agency Power.”SPEAEnglishDownload
7.PAR 74.63- Using Common-Pool Resource Principles to Design Local Government Fiscal Sustainability00:09:13Richard F. Callahan and Mark Pisano2/10/2016Professors Callahan and Pisano discuss their article co-authored with Shui-Yan Tang also at Price School of Public Policy titled, “Using Common-Pool Resource Principles to Design Local Government Fiscal Sustainability.” This article is currently available on early view and will be printed in Public Administration Review Issue 74 Volume 6.SPEAEnglishDownload
8.PAR 76.21-Gauging the Effects of Social Accountability on Services, Governance, and Citizen Empowerment00:07:27Derick W. Brinkerhoff2/10/2016Professor Brinkerhoff discusses his article titled “Gauging the Effects of Social Accountability on Services, Governance, and Citizen Empowerment” co-authored with Anna Wetterberg also an associate with the Research Triangle Institute International. This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 2.SPEAEnglishDownload
9.PAR 76.13 - The Impact of Performance Management on Performance in Public Organizations: A Meta-Analysis00:04:21Ed Gerrish2/10/2016This episode features comments by Ed Gerrish an assistant professor of public administration in the Department of Political Science at the University of South Dakota. Professor Gerrish discusses his article titled “The Impact of Performance Management on Performance in Public Organizations: A Meta-Analysis.” This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 1.SPEAEnglishDownload
10.PAR 76.23-Distinguishing Different Types of Coproduction: A Conceptual Analysis Based on the Classical Definitions00:06:15Marlies Honingh2/10/2016This episode features comments by Marlies Honingh an assistant professor of public administration in the Institute for Management Research at Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Professor Honingh discusses her article co-authored with Taco Brandsen, titled “Distinguishing Different Types of Coproduction: A Conceptual Analysis Based on the Classical Definitions.” This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 2.SPEAEnglishDownload
11.PAR 76.33-Five Ways to Make a Difference: Perceptions of Practitioners Working in Urban Neighborhoods00:05:07Catherine Durose2/10/2016This episode features comments by Zachary Mohr an assistant professor in the department of political science and public administration at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Professor Mohr discusses his article titled “Performance Measurement and Cost Accounting: Are They Complementary or Competing Systems of Control?” This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 4.SPEAEnglishDownload
12.PAR 76.41-Performance Measurement and Cost Accounting: Are They Complementary or Competing Systems of Control?00:05:51Zachary Mohr2/10/2016This episode features comments by Zachary Mohr an assistant professor in the department of political science and public administration at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Professor Mohr discusses his article titled “Performance Measurement and Cost Accounting: Are They Complementary or Competing Systems of Control?” This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 4.SPEAEnglishDownload
13.PAR 76.16-Caveat Emptor: What Do We Know about Public Administration Evidence and How Do We Know It00:05:48Kim R. Isett12/21/2015This episode features comments by Kim Isett an associate professor in the School of Public Policy at Georgia Tech University. Dr. Isett discusses her article titled “Caveat Emptor: What Do We Know about Public Administration Evidence and How Do We Know It?” co-authored with Brian Head and Gary Van Landingham. This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 1.SPEAEnglishDownload
14.PAR 76.32-Recovering the Craft of Public Administration00:07:52Roderick A. W. Rhodes12/15/2015This episode features comments by Roderick Rhodes a professor of government at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom. Professor Rhodes discusses his article titled “Recovering the Craft of Public Administration.” This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 3.SPEAEnglishDownload
15.PAR 76.24-Advancing Public Policy for High-Growth, Female, and Social Entrepreneurs00:09:58Siri Terjesen10/30/2015This episode features comments by Siri Terjesen a faculty member at Indiana University, Bloomington and visiting faculty at the Norwegian School of Economics, Norway. Professor Terjesen discusses her article titled “Advancing Public Policy for High-Growth, Female, and Social Entrepreneurs” co-authored with Niels Bosma and Erik Stam. This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 2.SPEAEnglishDownload
16.PAR 76.15-Do Policy Makers Use Academic Research? Reexamining the “Two Communities” Theory of Research Utilization00:08:43Joshua Newman10/11/2015This episode features comments by Joshua Newman a lecturer at Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia, and an honorary research fellow in the Institute for Social Science Research at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia. Professor Newman discusses his article titled “Do Policy Makers Use Academic Research? Reexamining the “Two Communities” Theory of Research Utilization” co-authored with Adrian Cherney and Brian W. Head. This article is currently available on early viewSPEAEnglishDownload
17.PAR 76.31-The Power Dynamics of Mandated Network Administrative Organizations00:06:09Angel Saz-Carranza10/8/2015This episode features comments by Angel Saz-Carranza director of the ESADEgeo Center for Global Economy and Geopolitics and lecturer in the Department of Strategy and General Management, at ESADE Business and Law School, Ramon Llull University. Professor Saz-Carranza discusses his article titled “The Power Dynamics of Mandated Network Administrative Organizations” co-authored with Susanna Salvador Iborra and Adrià Albareda. This article is currently available on early view and will be publishedSPEAEnglishDownload
18.PAR 76.14- Are Some Citizens More Equal than Others? Evidence from a Field Experiment00:04:23Christian Adam8/29/2015This episode features comments by Christian Adam a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Munich, Germany. Dr. Adam discusses his article titled “Are Some Citizens More Equal than Others? Evidence from a Field Experiment” co-authored with Stephan Grohs and Christoph Knill. This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 1.SPEAEnglishDownload
19.PAR 76.12(Full)-Representative Bureaucracy and the Willingness to Coproduce: An Experimental Study00:10:11Norma M. Riccucci8/13/2015This episode features comments by Norma M. Riccucci Board of Governors Distinguished Professor in the School of Public Affairs and Administration, Rutgers University–Newark. Professor Riccucci discusses her article titled “Representative Bureaucracy and the Willingness to Coproduce: An Experimental Study” co-authored with Gregg G. Van Ryzin and Huafang Li. This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 1.SPEAEnglishDownload
20.PAR 76.12- (Abridged) Representative Bureaucracy and the Willingness to Coproduce: An Experimental Study00:06:01Norma M. Riccucci8/13/2015This episode features comments by Norma M. Riccucci Board of Governors Distinguished Professor in the School of Public Affairs and Administration, Rutgers University–Newark. Professor Riccucci discusses her article titled “Representative Bureaucracy and the Willingness to Coproduce: An Experimental Study” co-authored with Gregg G. Van Ryzin and Huafang Li. This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 1.SPEAEnglishDownload
21.PAR 76.22-Representation and Collaboration: Exploring the Role of Shared Identity in the Collaborative Process00:06:22Tad Conner7/23/2015This episode features comments by Tad Conner and assistant professor in the Department of Government at New Mexico State University. Professor Conner discusses his article titled “Representation and Collaboration: Exploring the Role of Shared Identity in the Collaborative Process.” This article is currently available on early view and will be published in Public Administration Review Issue 76 Volume 2.SPEAEnglishDownload
22.PAR 75.23- Impossible Jobs or Impossible Tasks? Client Volatility and Frontline Policing Practice in Urban Riots00:06:05Kevin Morrell1/19/2015This episode features comments by Kevin Morrell professor of governance at Warwick Business School in the United Kingdom. Professor Morrell discusses his article co-authored with Graeme Currie also at the Warwick Business School titled “Impossible Jobs or Impossible Tasks? Client Volatility and Frontline Policing Practice in Urban Riots.” This article is currently available on early view and will be printed in Public Administration Review Issue 75 Volume 2.SPEAEnglishDownload
23.PAR 75.22- The Politics of Local Government Stabilization Funds00:08:22Douglas Snow1/7/2015This episode features comments by Douglas Snow professor of public service at Suffolk University in Boston. Professor Snow discusses his article co-authored with Gerasimos A. Gianakis and Jonathan Haughton titled “The Politics of Local Government Stabilization Funds.” This article is currently available on early view and will be printed in Public Administration Review Issue 75 Volume 2.SPEAEnglishDownload
24.PAR 75.21 - Representation and Inclusion in Public Organizations: Evidence from the U.K. Civil Service00:06:33Rhys Andrews1/5/2015This episode features comments by Rhys Andrews professor of public management at Cardiff Business School in the United Kingdom. Professor Andrews discusses his article titled, “Representation and Inclusion in Public Organizations: Evidence from the U.K. Civil Service.” This article is currently available on early view and will be printed in Public Administration Review Issue 75 Volume 2.SPEAEnglishDownload
25.PAR 75.1-Happy 75th, Public Administration Review00:04:15Jim Perry1/4/2015This issue ushers in Public Administration Review's 75th year of publication.SPEAEnglishDownload
26.PAR 74.64-Making Boston Strong: Social Capital, Collaboration, and Accountability Lessons for Public Administrators in the Twenty-First Century00:05:47Aimee L. Williamson11/10/2014This episode features comments by Aimee L. Williamson, Associate Professor in the Institute for Public Service at Suffolk University. Professor Williamson introduces the PAR symposium on the lessons learned from the Boston Marathon Bombings. This introduction titled, “Making Boston Strong: Social Capital, Collaboration, and Accountability Lessons for Public Administrators in the Twenty-First Century” was co-authored with Brenda J. Bond who is also an Associate Professor in the Institute for PuSPEAEnglishDownload
27.Par 74.61-What Have We Learned Since September 11, 2001? A Network Study of the Boston Marathon Bombings Response00:08:43Qian Hu10/2/2014In light of recent disasters, it is evident that more research is needed to understand how organizations can effectively coordinate disaster preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery efforts. This research assesses the effectiveness of interorganizational coordination and collaboration in response to the Boston Marathon bombings. After reviewing the major changes in federal emergency management policies and frameworks since September 11, 2001, this article applies a social network analysiSPEAEnglishDownload
28.Par 74.44- Public Value Governance: Moving Beyond Traditional Public Administration and the New Public Management00:07:35John M. Bryson6/11/2014This episode features comments by John M Bryson, the McKnight Presidential Professor of Planning and Public Affairs in the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota. Professor Bryson discusses his article titled, “Public Value Governance: Moving Beyond Traditional Public Administration and the New Public Management.” This article is part of the Symposium on Creating Public Value in a Multi-Sector Shared-Power World, which can be found in Public Administration Review IssSPEAEnglishDownload
29.PAR 74.43- Is the Public Economics Toolbox Applicable to Budget Analysis?00:09:05Abe Lackman6/4/2014This episode features comments by Abe Lackman, Senior Officer, Civic Affairs at the Simons Foundation and Scholar in Residence at the Graduate School of Education at Fordham University. This commentary is part of the Symposium on Creating Public Value in a Multi-Sector Shared-Power World, which can be found in Public Administration Review Issue 74 Volume 4. Mr. Lackman’s commentary is in response to the research article, “Creating Public Value with Tax and Spending Policies: The View from PublicSPEAEnglishDownload
30.PAR 74.42 - Neoliberalism for the Common Good? Public Value Governance and the Downsizing of Democracy00:05:50Adam Dahl5/24/2014This episode features comments by Adam Dahl, a PhD candidate in Political Science at the University of Minnesota. His co-author is Joe Soss, Cowles Chair for the Study of Public Service at the University of Minnesota, where he holds faculty positions in the Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Political Science, and Sociology. In this episode, Dahl reflects on their research article titled, “Neoliberalism for the Common Good? Public Value Governance and the Downsizing of Democracy.” ThisSPEAEnglishDownload
31.PAR 74.41 - Implicit Public Values and the Creation of Publicly Valuable Outcomes: The Importance of Work and the Contested Role of Labor Unions00:06:27John Budd5/14/2014This episode features comments by John Budd, professor of work and organizations in the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota, where he holds the Industrial Relations Land Grant Chair and is director of the Center for Human Resources and Labor Studies. In this episode, Professor Budd provides an overview of his research article titled, “Implicit Public Values and the Creation of Publicly Valuable Outcomes: The Importance of Work and the Contested Role of Labor Unions.” ThisSPEAEnglishDownload
32.PAR 74.31 - Want to Increase Trust in Government? Update Our Public Participation Laws00:07:15Matt Leighninger5/3/2014This episode features comments by Matt Leighninger, the executive director of the Deliberative Democracy Consortium, an alliance of the major organizations and leading scholars working in the field of democracy and citizenship. In this episode, Mr. Leighninger reads his Perspective titled, “Want to Increase Trust in Government? Update Our Public Participation Laws,” published in Public Administration Review Issue 74 Volume 3. Mr. Leighninger discusses the problems with conventional opportunitiesSPEAEnglishDownload